Children’s Book Review: Mr Splendiferous and the Troublesome Trolls by Rosen Trevithick; illustrated by Katie W. Stewart

Dangerous children eating trolls; a genius but mad scientist; and a group of unsuspecting schoolchildren on a trip to Splendiferous Science Park, with enough weird and wonderful exhibits to exercise all the senses of any young adventurer.

Mr S & TrollsA chase through the internal anatomy of the Rumbling Giant provides a science lesson while it entertains. I laughed as one child found that her only escape from a pursuing troll was … well, through the “great big, round pink bottom” of the exhibit.

Rosen Trevithick is very good at creating vivid images in the mind. At times as I read the book the images were as intense as in films such as Charlie and The Chocolate Factory. I began to see how Disney could build a Mr Splendiferous Science Park where even big kids like me could play.

You should try to read this on an eReader that displays in colour to fully experience Katie W. Stewart’s magical cover illustration.

If you want to open up your child’s imagination to the imagery that words can create and watch them laugh at the same time, then I’d highly recommend Mr Splendiferous and the Troublesome Trolls for reading to younger children, with the voices of course, and older children can entertain themselves with it. I’ve even heard that in England children are making trolls of their own.

Reviewed Aug/Sep 2013

Mr Splendiferous and the Troublesome Trolls is available at Amazon

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About georgehamilton

George Hamilton likes to know what’s going on around the world, to delve into the customs and practices of different cultures, and this is often a feature of his novels. His tales are based on people's intense personal or family dramas, with major social or political events strongly impacting their story. In addition to World Literature, he also writes multi-genre novels which include: Historical, Suspense/Thriller, and Contemporary. He currently lives in London, England.
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